Contributing to Open Supply Finest Practices from the Main League Hacking Fellows

We recently asked some of the Major League Hacking (MLH) Fellows what tools and practical applications they found useful to get started with open source. See what they have to say about getting started with open source, the MLH Fellowship program, and the Facebook open source ecosystem.

To open source articles

“It is a little difficult to get used to open source projects at first, but follow the updated documents to get yourself set up. Don’t be afraid to make pull requests related to small things like correcting documentation or finding a fix for a bug. The supervisors are very encouraging and helpful. Opening up problems and / or contacting them directly will help you avoid obstacles that you may encounter. “

– Sarthak Khattar, Pysa contributor

“I would say you should debug and track the repo from the start. It would help you boot up the code base faster. Also remember, don’t be afraid to ask for help! ”

– Samuel Adjei, Docusaurus contributor

“No solution is considered ‘bad’! If your contribution solves the problem well, it will always be used as a solution. ”

-Zhixiang Teoh, WebXR Contributor

“The best advice I can give future contributors is READ. This was probably the most effective way to get familiar with the various tools, or even how VISSL itself works. Read code, read articles, listen to mentors. “

– Aanand Kainth, VISSL contributor

“I would say that you should feel free to create topics and add suggestions wherever you see fit. While it may not be exactly the problem you are working on, you might discover a mistake or notice an error in the documents that could save others a lot of trouble. The Pysa community is very friendly and I am sure that they will appreciate your ideas even if your PR is not perfect and you are not sure. “

– Grace Gao, Pysa contributor

About mentoring

“First, try to find a mentor who is an active supervisor or an enthusiastic contributor to open source in general!”

– Scott Moses Sunarto, CrypTen contributor

“It’s important not to be intimidated by others’ experiences and the amount of code that is in the project the first time you try to contribute. You just need to remember that it is a community where everyone wants to learn and grow together to build something that would help many people. Once you take that first step, most of your inhibitions will disappear when you see how ready everyone is to help you and welcome you to the community. ”

– Lisa Chandra, Docusaurus contributor

“Ask for help if you need it! Stack Overflow can only get you this far, and you can’t learn so much from copying and pasting quick fixes that you don’t understand. What distinguishes open source from self-learning is the network of support from the supervisor and the community, so don’t forget to use this! ”

– Grace Gao, Pysa contributor

“Have fun with open source. Attend community events like hackathons and CTFs. Make lots of new friends and contacts. Contact the project supervisor and get to know the community members within this domain. ”

– Samuel Adjei, Docusaurus contributor

About the MLH scholarship

“Be active, book pair programming sessions with Raise.dev, establish a working relationship with the supervisors, reach out to your technical mentors about the current problem you have, and do your best if you can address the problems you are faced with. Above all, plan your time carefully. “

– Steven Hansel, Docusaurus contributor

“Facebook and MLH provide all the necessary resources to be successful in the fellowship program. Use your pod leader Raise.dev, the career advice and pair programming sessions and workshops. ”

– Grace Omotoso, VISSL contributor

“MLH Fellowship is much more than just code, it’s about having fun. It provides an amazing opportunity to get to know the supervisors of a project and the ideologies behind the open source project. It gives you an insight into best practices in software engineering and the most important pillars that make projects successful. ”

– Soham Parekh, WebXR contributor

“Have fun, get involved as much as possible, speak to the maintainers and other software professionals and ask them about any professional / technical doubts you have. The more active you will be, the more you will benefit from the overall community experience. ”

– Sarthak Khattar, Pysa contributor

“Communicate actively with your supervisors, mentors and project team colleagues! It is always important that everyone is on the same page and that expectations and goals are clearly defined. ”

-Zhixiang Teoh, WebXR Contributor

Tips to get you started

“Check out open source blogs and forums for instructions on how to get started. As far as working on Docusaurus is concerned, the most helpful resources are, as always, the supervisors and technical mentors! ”

– Lisa Chandra, Docusaurus contributor

“I want future contributors to know that no two projects are alike. When assigned to a new project things can look very daunting, but use the community to ask questions and things will make sense to you. ”

– Grace Omotoso, VISSL contributor

“Raise.dev mentors (both career counseling and pair programming are super helpful!) Along with weekly supervisor sync – extremely knowledgeable calls!”

– Scott Moses Sunarto, CrypTen contributor

“Try pair programming sessions with teammates or other community members, delve into previous code reviews, and ask for live debugging with experienced mentors.”

– Steven Hansel, Docusaurus contributor

“Check out open source resources like MDN Web Docs and Immersive Web Documentation, or other resources that contain specifications about how your project is organized and what it uses.”

– Soham Parekh, WebXR contributor

“Our technical mentors have been an incredibly useful learning resource. It was amazing to see how much knowledge they have and I am so glad that I was able to get in touch with them right from the start of the fellowship. ”

– Aanand Kainth, VISSL contributor

We’d like to thank all of our MLH fellows in spring 2021 for their continued contributions to the Facebook open source ecosystem.

If you’d like to learn more about Facebook Open Source, follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube for relevant updates. Check out our Contributor’s Story series to learn more about the work of our MLH Fellows and visit the projects these Fellows have worked on:

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